Author Archives | edward.lusk

The Technical Underpinnings and Extended What-If Analyses of the Decision Support Systems Programmed for the IOM 80/20 Nursing Initiative

One of the goals of the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) initiative: Analysing the Cost of Alternative Strategies Related to Nursing Education is to re-organize the nursing workforce in the United States so that after a relatively brief time, ten years or so, eighty per cent of the nursing workforce will consist of nurses with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree while, then by definition, the remaining twenty per cent will be Associate Degree & Diploma nurses. [The 80/20 Initiative]. To aid health planners to create the information to develop the policies needed to effect The 80/20 Initiative Kovner, Lee, Lusk, Katigbak & Selander (2013) developed two Decision Support Systems [DSS]: The SWAP: DSS and the Dynamic Change: DSS. In this companion communication, we elaborate on the construal overview presented by Kovner et al. (2013). Specifically, we: (1) present the technical details of The SWAP and The Dynamic Change DSSs, (2) prove that the SWAP benchmark is the least expenditure alternative, and (3) offer extended “What-If” analysis enrichments useful in summarizing the voluminous decision information that could be generated by these DSSs. Presenting these critical technical details on the functionality of these DSSs will create the synergistic transparency needed to encourage the use of these DSSs by health planners.

  The Technical Underpinnings and Extended what-if Analyses of the Decision Support Systems Programmed for the IOM 80/20 Nursing Initiative (917.6 KiB, 1,488 hits)

Posted in Economics, Knowledge Management, Volume III, Issue no. 3Comments Off on The Technical Underpinnings and Extended What-If Analyses of the Decision Support Systems Programmed for the IOM 80/20 Nursing Initiative

Investigation of: “Shopping in the Market-β Mall”

Beta [β], the simple regression slope of the returns of the Firm matched with those of the Market is a powerful financial signaling statistic in vogue since the 1960s, and still very much in use by financial analysts and firm decision makers. However, as there are a number of ways that one can obtain a measure of the period Firm-β, this begs the following question: Are there important differences in these various βs? If so, this opens up the possibility of agenda-serving game-driven signaling, and thereby compromises the reliability the β-information. We use the term “Market-β Mall” to indicate the temptation to go shopping for β in order to create a profile that would not be consistent as a Time-Benchmark for a particular firm. We show, clearly, that there are different measured values of β. Given the “adverse” selection implications, we suggest a simple way to maintain the reliably of this critical signal—the period β.

  Investigation of: “Shopping in the Market-β Mall” (1.1 MiB, 1,801 hits)

Posted in Issue no. 5, Knowledge ManagementComments Off on Investigation of: “Shopping in the Market-β Mall”